P O O L


 





Ocasional texts, videos, reflexions

brief look into MADEIRADIG 2009 (video)

texto about Fado ("Of ado eo Tubérculo", publicado no P3)







check my page with interviews and reviews here

 

 

a few Inspirations, from all times !

from:
Robert Fripp
Bruce Nauman
Pina Bausch
Picasso
Sir George Herbert Read
Noam Chomsky
Jung




>

(...) As a musician, I am unable to perform where the performance is only a piece of promotion: this degrades the performance in a subtle way, insults the audience and humiliates the performer. As a professional musician, I am prepared to pretend to powerful creatures of the industry that a performance is promotional. But when I believe it, music will have died inside me. (...)

(...)Soundscapes continue to surprise, excite, educate and instruct me. They are quite amazing. They have the characteristic of being true to the moment in which they are performed. That is, they honour this key principle: act in accordance with time, place and person. (...)

(...)To be a listener, to become a member of an audience, requires as much training as to become a musician. Listening is active, and our instrument is the ears. How we use our ears is part of the craft of listening.(...)

(...)If any culture is to be healthy, and vital, the opportunity to see through our artists' eyes and hear through their ears is a necessity. But it is not a necessity that we give attention to how our artists rationalise their seeing.(...)

(...)Any culture whose artists are directed or controlled by commercial interests is in mortal danger.(...)

Robert Fripp

These comments were written at the Claymont Mansion, Charles Town, West Virginia, during the fourth Guitar Craft (Application & Assimilation) course, during August 25 - 30th., 1995.
more on: That Which Passes

>

(...) I know there are artists who function in relation to beauty - who try to make beautiful things. They are moved by beautiful things and they see that as their role: to provide or make beautiful things for other people. I don't work that way. Part of it has to do with an idea of beauty. Sunsets, flowers, landscapes: these kinds of things don't move me to do anything. I just want to leave them alone. My work comes out of being frustrated about the human condition. And about how people refuse to understand other people. And how people can be cruel to each other. It's not that I think I can change that, but it's just such a frustrating part of human history. (...)
Joan Simon:Breaking the Silence. An interview with Bruce Nauman. Art in America 76, no 9, September 1988.

(...) Later, I realized I would never have a specific process; I would have to re-invent it, over and over again (...)

(...) On the other hand, that’s what’s interesting about making art, and why it’s worth doing: it’s never going to be the same, there is no method. (...)

Bruce Nauman

more on:
Bruce Nauman


>

(...) O último dos critérios é sempre o sentimento, porque é o mais justo. Pensamos com o sentimento. O cérebro não faz mais do que formular o que já foi "pensado" pelo sentimento.(...)

Pina Bausch

TV documentary


>

Entre os muitos pecados que me acusam nenhum é mais injustificado do que o que diz que o elemento mais importante da minha obra é o espírito da procura. Quando pinto é para indicar o que encontrei, e não o que procuro. Em arte não chega querer. Como se diz em Espanha: o amor prova-se por factos, não por argumentos.
Só interessa o que um homem faz, não o que tenciona fazer.

Picasso

in Künstlerbekenntnisse, Berlin, Prropylaen Verlag, 1923(?)


>

(...) O subjectivismo é um clima mental anunciado há mais de um século por Kierkegaard e Hegel (...)
(...) O artista moderno depende tremendamente dos meios de publicidade. Nisto consiste a sua suprema humilhação. (...)

Sir George Herbert Read

in The Philisophy of Modern Art, Faber and Faber (1952)

 

>

(...)Walter Lippmann, the dean of American journalism, is the person who coined the phrase "manufacture of consent." He advocated it since, in a democratic society, you can't control people by force. Therefore, you've got to control what they think. That's an idea that goes back to the 17th century. It was the immediate élite reaction to the first democratic revolutions, and it grew to become a major theme in modern 20th-century liberal-democratic theory. The voice of the people can be heard, so you've got to control what it says. That's not so important in a totalitarian state, where you just control what people do.(...)

Noam Chomsky

in "The Radical Vocation: An Interview with Noam Chomsky"
Interview and transcription by
Adam Jones -February 20, 1990
more on:
Interview

>


Eternal truth needs a human language that alters with the spirit of the times.

Carl Jung

more on:  The C. G. Jung Page